Book Review: The Glorious Heresies

The Glorious Heresies

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

“The Glorious Heresies” opens with a bang (quite literally) and doesn’t let up from there. Maureen Phelan thwacks an intruder over the head, killing him. She’s left to call on her son, Jimmy, to get rid of the body.

From there, the novel introduces us to a variety of other characters, all of whom have some connection to the body and/or Jimmy. The man Jimmy hires to dispose of the corpse recognizes the body. Ryan, the son of the man who gets rid of the body, is introduced to and sells drugs to Georgie, the dead man’s girlfriend. Georgie, desperate to find out what happens, go around asking too many questions, putting her own life at risk.

Set in Cork, Ireland, as it struggles to recover from the 2008 crash, the novel jumps from character to character. It often leaps forward years in time. It’s fast moving, engaging, and heart breaking. Georgie, Ryan, Jimmy and Maureen all have various levels of suffering and dismay in their lives. Maureen was separated from Jimmy when he was a baby because she was an unwed mother. In at attempt to flee her life as a sex worker and drug addict, Georgie joins a weird cult, only to have the members of the cult treat her just as poorly as those on the outside. Ryan takes the fall for his drug dealer boss, landing in jail and pretty much destroying his chance of getting out of a life of crime.

No matter what, it seems every thing goes wrong for the characters. Some of it’s their fault, but most of it is due to their crappy circumstances. The novel’s strength is that it doesn’t pass judgment on the characters or push us to feel deep levels of pity for them. Instead, it’s downright funny at times, even as it’s pointing out the troubles in the world.

 

*I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for my  honest review*

Book Review: How to Pack

How to Pack

How to Pack by Hitha Palepu

We all probably have at least one experience that made us realize we needed to be better at packing and planning for a trip. Here’s mine: I was in 5th grade and my class was going for a three day camping trip. We were responsible for carrying our stuff from the bus to the cabins, including sleeping bags and luggage. I knew this. And yet, I still overpacked. All I remember is dragging my very heavy, floral print duffel bag and this awful sleeping bag, which managed to come unrolled, to the cabin, wishing I had packed less.

Who even knows what I packed for that trip or why it was so heavy. But probably, had I read a copy of “How to Pack” by Hitha Palepu beforehand, I would have packed a lot lighter. Not brought that silly, very large and heavy duffel bag.

Live and learn.

“How to Pack” is a quick read that’s full of useful information. It covers how to pick what to bring, how many of each item you’ll want to bring, and how to put things together. It doesn’t seek to answer the age old question “roll or fold?” but instead gives you points and tips for using each, as well as handy diagrams of how to either roll or fold your clothing. The book discusses different suitcase styles and sizes and when you might want to bring one style on your trip versus a different style.

If you’re a chronic overpacker or disorganized packer, the book will really help you get it together and fit what you need for a multi-day (and even multi-city) trip in one carry-on.

That all said, I’m not sure this book is for everyone. I’ve grown a lot since my 5th grade camping days and a lot of the info in the book was old hat for me. It’s also mostly targeted at a female audience, or at least at an audience who would be thinking of bringing dresses, jewelry and cosmetics on a trip.

As an added bonus, the book has a few blank packing lists at the back, which you can use not only to plan what you’ll bring on your next trip, but also what outfits you’ll wear and when.

** I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review. **